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Register Now Agenda Course Descriptions Instructor Bios Exhibitors Travel Accommodations

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The Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center (NLC) is thrilled to announce our Sixth Annual Summer Conference promoting strong and safe Tribal communities hosted by the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Florida on June 3-5, 2014. Growing strong and safe communities requires knowledge and strategies to develop sustainable housing initiatives, preserve language and culture, encourage financial wellness, and write grant proposals. This three-day conference will educate participants on topics related to culture revitalization, sustainable housing, grants education, Tribal government and financial wellness.

Registration is FREE for Native Americans and Those Working Within Indian Country

Who Should Attend:

Any Native American, Tribal members, or community leader interested in gaining valuable skills and technical knowledge in the key areas of community development. The conference is also open to all employees working in Native businesses and Native communities.



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Conference Registration

There is just one week left before the start of the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center (NLC) Sixth Annual Summer Conference. Online pre-registration is now closed. If you would like to pre-register call the Native Learning Center at 954-985-2315, or join us on-site at the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Hollywood, FL, Tuesday, June 3, 2014 at 7:00 am to register on-site. Breakfast will be served in Ballroom B at 7:30 am and Sessions begin at 8:30 am on Tuesday, June 3, 2014.

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Ballroom G

Ballroom H

Ballroom D

Meeting Room 4

Meeting Room 3

7:00am - 7:30am

Walk the Rock | Location: Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Pool

7:30am - 8:30am

Breakfast (Ballroom B)

Opening Prayer

Welcome from the

Seminole Tribe of Florida Dignitaries

Strong Communities: Valuing Quality Over Quantity Presentation by:

Chance Rush (Three Affiliated Tribes (Hidatsa)) | Cloudboy Consulting, LLC

8:30am - 10:00am

Ancient Native

Traditional Games

(3 hours)

OWEESTA Building Native Communities:

Financial Skills for Families -

Train the Trainer

(6 Hours, Day 1)

 

This Course Requires a Seperate Registration Click Here to Register Now

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture through Team
Awareness & Resilience

(6 Hours, Day 1)

Strategies for Addressing the Impact of Sequestration in

Indian Housing

(1.5 hours)

 

 

 

Federal Funding Sources for Business, Economic Development, Feasibility & Strategic Planning

(3 hours, Lab)

View Course Description

Kevin Fitzgibbons

 

Gentri White

(Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin)

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Instructor Bio

View Course Description

10:30am - 12:00pm

Mike James

(Skowkale First Nation)

Krystal Langholz

 

Chris Hansen

(Ojibway)

Denise Harvey

(Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde)

 

Joel Bennett

Veteran’s Assistance in Supportive Housing: New HUD Pilot Program

(1.5 Hours)

Wanda Jean Lord

(Cherokee / Choctaw)

View Course Description

Kevin Fitzgibbons

 

Zoe LeBeau

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

12:00pm - 1:30pm

Lunch (Ballroom B)

Continuation of: Strong Communities; Valuing Quality Over Quantity Presentation by: Chance Rush | (Three Affiliated Tribes (Hidatsa)) | Cloudboy Consulting, LLC

Exhibitor Presentations

View Exhibitors

1:30pm - 3:00pm

Substance Abuse:

A Counter Culture to Tradition

(3 hours)

 

Continuation of:

Continuation of:

Marketing and Branding Your Organization

(3 hours)

 

 

USDA RBEG Funding - Hands On - Feasibility Funding to Increase Economic Development

(3 hours, Lab)

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

3:30pm - 5:00pm

Mark Panasiewicz

 

Carrie Paquette

OWEESTA

Building Native Communities:

Financial Skills for
Families-Train the Trainer

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture through Team Awareness & Resilience

 

Tiffany Landry

 

Wanda Jean Lord

(Cherokee / Choctaw)

 

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

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Day 2, Wednesday, June 4, 2014

 

Ballroom G

Ballroom H

Ballroom D

Meeting Room 4

Meeting Room 3

Meeting Room 2

7:00am - 7:30am

Walk the Rock | Location: Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Pool

7:30am - 8:30am

Breakfast (Ballroom B)

Opening Prayer

Self-Determination through Training and Technical Assistance Presented by:
Mike Andrews | Director of Headquarters Operations for the Office of Native American Programs at the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

8:30am - 10:00am

Mold Remediation in
Indian Country

(1.5 Hours)

OWEESTA Building Native Communities:
Financial Skills for Families - Train the Trainer

(6 Hours, Day 2)

 

This Course Requires a Seperate Registration Click Here to Register Now

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture through Team Awareness & Resilience

(6 Hours, Day 2)

Walking the Four Directions - A Cultural View of Supervision

(6 Hours, Day 1)

Tribal Government -

What You Want to Know but are Afraid to Ask!

(3 Hours)

 

 

Motivation & Goals:

So Why Don’t We Make

FRY BREAD?

(3 Hours)

View Course Description

Kevin Fitzgibbons

 

Gentri White

(Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin)

View Instructor Bio

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

10:30am - 12:00pm

Case Studies and Best Practices for Exemplary Tribal Housing

(1.5 Hours)

Krystal Langholz

 

Chris Hansen

(Ojibway)

Denise Harvey

(Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde)

 

Joel Bennett

Alan Rabideau

(The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa)

Ben Ray III

(Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians / Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma)

 

Elizabeth Howe

(Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe)

Patti Mitchell

(Cherokee Nation)

View Course Description

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow)

 

Zane Fischer

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

12:00pm - 1:30pm

Lunch (Ballroom B)

Continuation of: Community Safety; Protecting Our Families Presentation by:

Chance Rush (Three Affiliated Tribes (Hidatsa)) | Cloudboy Consulting, LLC

Seminole Fashion Show

1:30pm - 3:00pm

Measuring Design Impact and Community Resiliency in Indian Country -

Case Study
Santo Domingo Pueblo

(1.5 Hours)

Continuation of:

Continuation of:

Continuation of:

 

Linking Generations: Creating Cultural Vision

(3 Hours)

Utilizing Cultural Ceremonies to Heal

(1.5 Hours)

View Course Description

View Course Description

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow)

 

Zane Fischer

Mike James

(Skowkale First Nation)

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

3:30pm - 5:00pm

Online Housing Development Tool - Beta Testing Workshop

(1.5 Hours)

OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families - Train the Trainer

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture through Team Awareness & Resilience

 

Walking the Four Directions -

A Cultural View of Supervision

MarIlynn Jones-Parker

 

Catherine Parker

(Comanche)

Work Rewards: Find Out How the Earned Income Tax Credit Can Help Your Community

(1.5 Hours)

View Course Description

View Course Description

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow)

 

Zane Fischer

Patsy Schramm

(Cherokee Nation)

Yvonneda Thompson

(Cheyenne)

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

5:00pm - 5:30pm

 

 

 

 

 

Self-Determination through Training and Technical Assistance

Mike Andrews

View Instructor Bio

Top of Agenda | Top of Page

Day 3, Thursday, June 5, 2014



 

Ballroom G

Ballroom H

Ballroom D

Meeting Room 4

Meeting Room 3

7:30am - 8:30am

Breakfast (Ballroom B)

Opening Prayer

Investing Time: A Commitment To Our Community Presentation by:
Chance Rush (Three Affiliated Tribes (Hidatsa)) | Cloudboy Consulting, LLC

8:30am - 10:00am

Strength in Numbers:

Using Data to Elevate

Program Management

(6 hours)

 

OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families - Train the Trainer

(6 Hours, Day 3)

 

This Course Requires a Seperate Registration Click Here to Register Now

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture through Team Awareness & Resilience

(3 Hours, Day 3)

Walking the Four Directions -

A Cultural View of Supervision

(6 Hours, Day 2)

 

 

Grants A to Z:

RFP Preparation

(1.5 hours)

View Course Description

Ben Ray III

(Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians / Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma)

 

Elizabeth Howe

(Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe)

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Instructor Bio

10:30am - 12:00pm

Kevin Klingbeil

 

Julie Malakie

Krystal Langholz

 

Chris Hansen

(Ojibway)

Denise Harvey

(Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde)

 

Joel Bennett

Alan Rabideau

(The Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa)

Grants A to Z:

Grants Management

(1.5 hours)

View Course Description

Ben Ray III

(Big Valley Band of Pomo Indians / Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma)

 

Elizabeth Howe

(Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe)

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

12:00pm - 1:30pm

Lunch (Ballroom B)

The Osceola Brothers Live!

(Seminole Tribe of Florida/Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma)

Conference Feedback Raffle Drawing

1:30pm - 3:00pm

Continuation of:

 

Continuation of:

Financing Sustainable Affordable Housing in Indian Country

(3 hours)

Continuation of:

 

Strong Native Youth -

Strong and Safe Communities

(1.5 hours)

View Course Description

Tiffany Lee

(Navajo and Oglala Lakota)

View Instructor Bio

3:30pm - 5:00pm

Strength in Numbers: Using Data to Elevate Program Management

OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families - Train the Trainer

Shelly Tucciarelli

(Oneida Tribe of Wisconsin)

 

Josie Kotsioris

 

Walking the Four Directions -

A Cultural View of Supervision

Play-Ed!

The Social Media Game

(1.5 hours)

View Course Description

Patti Mitchell

(Cherokee Nation)

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bio

Top of Agenda | Top of Page


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Course Descriptions

Ancient Native Traditional Games

Mike James

Ancient Traditional Native games are games that were originated by our Native ancestors and you hardly see them played anymore. Traditional games are a unique way to reintegrate some of our culture to our People; they also have a unique hook when working with our young people. The instructor will have his equipment out on display and provide a presentation on the various games, who originated them, why they were played, and the traditional values connected to each respective game.

Case Studies and Best Practices for Exemplary Tribal Housing

Joseph Kunkel, Daniel Glenn, and Nathaniel Corum

The Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative (SNCC), an initiative of Enterprise Community partners, was established in 2009 to confront the issues of cultural sustainability and green best practices for Native American Indian Tribes in the United States. This instructional session will present lessons learned and best practices based on site visits, dialogue, video documentation, and research that was funded by a HUD Policy Development and Research Office Sustainable Construction in Indian Country grant.

The presentation will highlight the visioning process, innovative approaches, and critical partnerships that Tribal housing authorities are using to build beautiful, culturally relevant, environmentally sound, and healthy homes. This will include a breakout session for participants to discuss how to better introduce a collaborative, culturally appropriate process within their own communities. The end of the session will include a more detailed presentation of Tribal green building best practices.

Federal Funding Sources for Business, Economic Development, Feasibility & Strategic Planning

Wanda Jean Lord

Your Indian Housing Plan and IHBG funding can provide you with the framework to increase the Native or Tribally owned business enterprises in your community, engage in economic development planning, or even create win-win collaborations with surrounding towns, counties, and municipalities while building a variety of community facilities and infrastructure options. Learn the tools necessary to leverage your IHBG funding with other sources of federal funding in this interactive session.

Financing Sustainable Affordable Housing in Indian Country

Shelly Tucciarelli and Josie Kotsioris

Use tax credit incentive programs, such as Low Income Housing Tax Credits and other gap financing resources to accomplish housing needs in Indian country. Presentation topics will include Low Income Housing Tax Credit scoring and structuring, analyzing, and applying for appropriate gap financing, managing lenders, investing, and community expectations. The discussion will also identify the challenges of developing specific types of sustainable affordable housing, such as rural, elder, special needs, and adaptive reuse.

Grants A to Z: Grants Management

Ben Ray III and Elizabeth Howe

Why do so many Tribes have issues staying up to date in program reporting and financial management reporting of their grants? Learn successful strategies in grants management, developing the right tools to successfully track your funding once it is received from the very beginning and utilizing your federal agency program coordinator/manager to their fullest extent. Stay proficient in changing trends in grant requirements within program years, accessing training, collaborative meetings, and resources.

Grants A to Z: RFP Preparation

Ben Ray III and Elizabeth Howe

Break down the mystery of grant writing, and tell a compelling story based on needs. Get the maximum potential for successful funding proposals. Participants will learn how to research, prepare, and submit an RFP tailored to the specific nature of the agency providing potential funding. Learn how to interpret the language of grant proposals, federal agency verbiage, Tribal needs, operational ability, and performance objectives.

Linking Generations: Creating Cultural Vision

Marilynn Jones-Parker and Catherine Parker

This class will address the influence that elders have on youth and the influence youths have on elders. Our interactions allow for the passing of traditions and support the vision we wish to create for our future communities. Understanding the importance of these relationships and how the exchange of culture through storytelling, rituals, ceremonies, and daily living skills passed down traditionally can help increase cultural identity and well-being in our youth.

In addition to learning practical ways to create meaningful inter-generational relationships between youths and elders, this class will discuss positive ways our youth can introduce our elders to healthy eating habits, the use of technology and much more. Participants will gain an understanding of the mutual benefits of the powerful enrichment that youth can provide for elders. These mutual teachings and respectful companionships can assist with challenges faced by both groups as they embrace old traditions and learn new technologies.

Marketing and Branding Your Organization

Tiffany Landry

Do you know what your company’s packaging, marketing materials, and website say to your clients or customers? How are you perceived? And how do you want to be perceived? Come learn about marketing and branding your organization and how it affects your overall image. Feel free to bring samples of your marketing pieces (brochures, business cards, etc.) to discuss during the class.

Topics Covered: • What is Branding? • Segmenting the Market • Focusing on your Target Group • Consistency of Marketing Materials

Measuring Design Impact and Community Resiliency in Indian Country – Case Study Santo Domingo Pueblo

Joseph Kunkel, Daniel Glenn, and Nathaniel Corum

Contextually speaking, Native American Indians in general, and Native American Indian communities in particular, can be described as some of the most resilient communities operating in North America today. One example of these communities is the Santo Domingo Pueblo, where the average family size is 6-8 people, operating on a budget between $14,000-$16,600. This understanding of how indigenous communities operate outside the WesternEuroAmerican worldview is crucial to understanding resiliency and what it means to design within these boundaries of Indian Country. With projects like Owe’Neh Bupingen, Ohkay Owingeh and Place of Hidden Waters, Puyallup Tribe of Indians, we see how design thinking can support community resiliency through collaboration with community members. This presentation will showcase the early stages of community interaction with the Santo Domingo Pueblo, and how we are measuring design impact and systems thinking through a culturally appropriate, place-base framework. The work presented will describe the early stages of the housing development process and how the Housing Authority is working collaboratively with other Tribal programs to create housing for the community.

Mold Remediation in Indian Country

Kevin Fitzgibbons and Gentri White

Congress remains concerned about the prevalence of mold in Indian housing. A study conducted by HUD in 2003 found that 15 percent of the housing sampled was infected with mold. Since that study, additional Tribes have reported even greater incidence of mold in their housing. In 2004, the Institute of Medicine linked mold exposure to upper respiratory symptoms and asthma. To help address this issue, Congress recently appropriated $10,000,000 to fund grants for mold remediation and prevention in Indian housing. This funding will be awarded to grantees through a single national competition to ensure that grants are awarded to Tribes with the greatest need. This course will discuss the impact of mold in Indian housing, effective ways to remediate it, and the process of applying for the Congressional set aside.

Motivation and Goals: So Why Don’t We Make FRYBREAD?

Patti Mitchell

Does the thought of having a big, fluffy, dripping, fresh, just out of the grease, slightly hard crusted edged, wrapped in a decorated Bounty paper towel piece of frybread make your mouth water right now? So why don’t we make frybread?

The question isn’t about…why don’t we make frybread, but actually about identifying what it is that keeps us from getting what we want, or taking what we may not always be satisfied with.

Follow presenter, Patti Mitchell, owner of Little Red Marketing and Get Social-able, as she invites you to identify, question, and re-think why we all lose that point of motivation and become inactive.

Make your life as tasty as fry bread! This session is designed to make participants hungry! Hungry, that is, to set life in motion. Find your external forces and keep them in constant motion…

Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families

Krystal Langholz and Chris Hansen

Oweesta is pleased collaborate with the Native Learning Center to host the next Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families, 4th edition, Certified Instructor Training at the Native Learning Center’s 6th Annual Summer Conference. This training will offer a three-day, state-of-the-art instructor training and certification program to help Native CDFIs, Tribes and other Native organizations establish and sustain financial education programs within their communities. It gives an in-depth look at the Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families curriculum as well as gain access to a new, innovative evaluation approach that will assist in the gathering of impact data. Participants may be eligible for follow up technical assistance from Oweesta to create and sustain their financial education programs in their local communities. Upon completion of the training, participants will be prepared to successfully pass the Building Native Communities certification exam, becoming certified financial education trainers. Participants must pre-register for this event. Oweesta is accepting registration applications to attend this training until April 30, 2014 or until filled. Early and quality applications will be prioritized, so please register early and fully complete the Oweesta registration application. Click here for more registration information. Click here for additional information.

Play-Ed! The Social Media Game

Patti Mitchell

Social media has become a common channel of communication for many. As more and more people are staying connected with one another online, being able to build meaningful and personal relationships with others online has become important to us. This course provides participants with the practical skills and knowledge required to understand and use common social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube.

Who should attend? Individuals who want to connect and communicate effectively with others online using the latest Internet technologies and responsible parents who want to know or learn how their children connect with others online and also become connected with them.

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture through Team Awareness & Resilience

Denise Harvey and Joel Bennett

This workshop is for any employer/employee seeking effective tools for health promotion inside a Tribal organization. Participants will acquire tools to revitalize culture and improve the overall health and productivity of workplace/Tribal government. There is significant relationship between our connection with traditional Tribal values/cultural heritage and the overall health and well being of Tribal organizations. Indeed, research suggests that being disconnected from cultural traditions is a significant determinant of health and mental health issues in Tribal youth and adults (UC Davis Health Systems, 2004). Over the past decade, there has been a significant growth in workplace health promotion programs. Unfortunately, there has not been a method for culture-based adaptations of health promotion in Native American workplace contexts. This workshop is based on the presenters’ experience with the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde and provides a direct experience of an evidence-based program called “Team Awareness” and gives participants skills for transferring concepts from training back into their workplace/Tribal environment.

Strategies for Addressing the Impact of Sequestration in Indian Housing

Kevin Fitzgibbons and Gentri White

The recent Congressional budget agreement has reduced the proposed sequestration cuts for both 2014 and 2015. Originally those cuts were scheduled to be $109 billion in each year. The 2014 cut is $64 billion, and the $2015 cut $91 billion. What does this mean for Indian Housing? The new 2015 cut, $91 billion, is actually higher than the 2013 cut of $86 billion. This course will provide the latest information on Federal budget developments and the implications for Indian Housing. In addition, this course will explore strategies for dealing with future budgetary issues, highlighting available financing and leveraging opportunities.

Strength in Numbers: Using Data to Elevate Program Management

Kevin Klingbeil and Julie Malakie

Data drives sound Tribal decision making in addition to federal program funding allocation. This course will specifically address why all Tribes should be collecting their own data, how they would go about developing a data collection project, the particular applications of data collection in streamlining housing management and other settings, and the range of other uses for data and GIS programs within Tribal programs and Tribal planning. Presenters will draw upon specific examples of recent Tribal data collection and compilation projects, including projects in the Dakotas, Alaska, and Washington State as context for the project development discussion. To illustrate the feasibility and variety of Tribal data collection projects while highlighting the need for alternative sources of Tribal data, they will also provide additional reference to the various federal funding formulas, especially with regard to how the data are distorted during the formula allocation processes.

Strong Native Youth – Strong and Safe Communities

Tiffany Lee

Native youth are the key to our cultural continuity. However, Native youth are often portrayed as disconnected to their cultural heritage. Yet, research shows Native youth strongly desire to strengthen their cultural backgrounds and their Native language skills. This course will share current understandings of the connections between Native youth, their heritage language, their cultural identity, and strong communities. You will learn about current research that demonstrates the complex and fluid identities of native youth. Their heritage languages play an important role in shaping their sense of self, regardless of their levels of fluency in their language.

This course will raise your awareness of the issues affecting Native youth today, and it will provide you with ways to work with Native youth to motivate and guide their development toward securing Native nations’ self-determined futures. You will engage in group discussions, multi-media, and hands-on activities to raise your understanding of the issues across your communities or organizations along with those issues that affect Native youth and people across the United States and beyond.

Substance Abuse: A Counter Culture to Tradition

Mark Panasiewicz and Carrie Paquette

Enablement Prevention has been in practice and an element in recovery for at least the last 20 years, originating from Group Guided Interaction and the 12-step program. Hope Works’ Enablement Prevention Program (EPP) combines an interactive presentation where participants experiencing similar problems reach out, share and receive experiences, and knowledge. Furthermore, the class educates on how drug abuse and enablement help destroy culture and break down traditions. Finally, EPP will educate on how the drug culture is creating a counter culture in the Native American community.

Tribal Government – What You Want to Know but are Afraid to Ask

Ben Ray III and Elizabeth Howe

Learn the hidden (or not so hidden) expectations of being a successful Tribal Administrator. Are you staying up to date on successful trends in Tribal government operation? Learn how to create a cohesive staff, provide them with the support and resources they need with clear job titles, expectations, and reviews. Review a Tribal operation, top to bottom and provide feedback on positive opportunities to make the most of an efficient operation. AND finally, how to deal with your most challenging (read = difficult) employees!

USDA RBEG Funding – Hands On – Feasibility Funding to Increase Economic Development

Wanda Jean Lord

Feasibility planning might support planning for things like business development, community facilities development, and sustainability planning. Learn to budget for and afford expert consultants in development, business planning, architectural, and project management so your projects can provide strong planning documents that you can then use to leverage into new funding streams.

Utilizing Cultural Ceremonies to Heal

Mike James

Throughout time the native nations have been plagued with hardship as a result of the “new comers” coming to our territories. This is a fact of our existence. Unfortunately, too many of our Native people remain in the victim role and have been unable to heal from these abusive issues.

This workshop will offer presentations that will help participants become aware that we need to move forward and begin a healing process if we are to stop the cycle of abuse that plagues our Native nations.

Veteran’s Assistance in Supportive Housing: New HUD Pilot Program

Kevin Fitzgibbons and Zoe LeBeau

Veterans Assistance in Supportive Housing (VASH) is money that is available through HUD to provide ongoing permanent rental subsidies for homeless veterans. Hundreds of thousands of dollars have been made available to communities around the country, but Tribes have never been eligible to apply for this funding. A new pilot project currently written into the NAHASDA reauthorization will make up to 5% of this year’s allocation (approximately 750 vouchers) available for Tribes.

Walking the Four Directions – A Cultural View of Supervision

Alan Rabideau

Using the “Laws of Nature” and a relational view of the world, this training explores how the four cardinal directions or “Medicine Wheel” can be used as a framework that supervisors can use to help them define a style of leadership or supervision that is strength-based, non-confrontational and culturally sensitive. This workshop will use a variety of techniques such as lecture, small and large group activities and demonstrations to deliver the information in a way that is conducive to the adult style of learning. This training is also helpful for those supervisors who may be responsible in leading or supervising employees with behavioral or emotional issues.

Work Rewards: Find Out How the Earned Income Tax Credit Can Help Your Community

Patsy Schramm and Yvonneda Thompson

The Earned Income Tax Credit is one of the nation’s largest anti-poverty programs, lifting over 6 million people from poverty each year. Yet a quarter of eligible workers don’t claim the credit, and about a third of the eligible population turns over every year. A family with 3 or more children earning less than $51,000 may qualify for a refund up to $6,000. That can boost a family and an entire community. First Nations Development Institute has been working with Volunteer Income Tax Assistance sites serving Native communities for many years. From that experience, a guide to creating and maintaining successful Native-serving VITA sites was developed along with an assessment of the current field and its needs to continue and thrive. If you’re interested in starting or expanding a volunteer free income tax preparation program to help individuals claim the credit and build assets and to enhance community economic growth, this session is a must for you.

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Travel Accommodations


Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Logo
Our host hotel is the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Hollywood, FL. Rooms are $108.00 per night if you book before Wednesday, May 14, 2014. Call booking number 1-800-937-0010 using group code GNLC14 or book online at http://www.seminolehardrockhollywood.com/hotel/reservations.php using group code: GNLC14 and password: GNLC14 .


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In accordance with 2 CFR Chapter II Part 200, OMB Super Circular, Subpart E (Cost Principles), Provision 200.432 (Conferences), the Native Learning Center exercises discretion and judgment in ensuring that costs for conferences, training, technical assistance, and all other meetings and events (including retreats, seminars, symposiums, workshops, etc.), are appropriate, necessary, and managed in a manner that minimizes costs to its Federal award.

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