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The Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center (NLC) is pleased to present Training for Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country hosted by the Radisson Hotel & Conference Center Green Bay in, Green Bay, Wisconsin, April 1 – 3, 2014. The NLC will provide Tribal communities with the tools to develop economic opportunities, sustainable community infrastructures, alternative energy sources, and provide essential building blocks to create safer communities. Over the course of this three-day conference participants will be able to attend critical sessions related to Tribal housing programs and imperative to HUD’s Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) Program. Topics include, but are not limited to, NAHASDA related courses, youth and elder opportunities, and crime prevention.

Registration is FREE for Native Americans and Those Working Within Indian Country

Who Should Attend:


» Acquisitions Managers
» CEO’s of Housing Authorities
» CFO’s of Housing Authorities
» Chief Development Officers
» Community Planners
» COO’s of Housing Authorities
» Directors of Housing
» Executive Directors of Housing Authorities
» Grant Managers


» Home Ownership Councilors
» Housing Authority Directors
» Housing Commissioners
» Housing Managers
» Housing Officers
» Housing Specialists
» Members of Housing Boards
» Tribal CFO’s

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Conference Registration

There is just one week left before the start of the Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center (NLC) Training for Building Sustainable Communities in Indian Country. Online pre-registration is now closed. If you would like to pre-register call the Native Learning Center at 954-985-2315, or join us on-site at the Radisson Hotel & Conference Center Green Bay in, Green Bay, Wisconsin, Tuesday, April 1, 2014 at 7:00 am to register on-site. Breakfast will be served in the Wolf Room at 7:30 am and Sessions begin at 8:30 am on Tuesday, April 1, 2014.

We look forward to meeting you in Green Bay!

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Huron

Ontario | (Lab)

Michigan

Oneida

Bear Room

7:30am - 8:30am

Breakfast (Wolf Room)

8:30am - 10:00am

Fighting Methamphetamine and Pharmaceutical Abuse Issues in Indian Country

(3 Hours)

Using New Market Tax Credits to Enhance Sustainablr Communities

(3 Hours)

Preserving Language:

Turning Speakers into Teachers

(1.5 Hours)

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture Through Team Awareness & Resilience: Day 1

(6 Hours, Day 1)

Learning from Our Elders

(3 Hours)

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

Ron Gurley

(Cherokee Tribe of Oklahoma)

Sarah Wheelock

(Meskwaki Nation)

 

Leonika Charging

(MHA Nation of the Fort Berthold
Indian Reservation)

 

Nakia Zavalla

(Santa Ynez Chumash)

 

Kathleen Marshall

(Santa Ynez Chumash)

Denise Harvey

(Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde)

 

Joel Bennett

Jamie Blosser

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow Tribe of Montana)

 

Nathaniel Corum

 

 

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Ray Demers

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

10:30am - 12:00pm

History and Success of Youth Programs in Indian Country

(1.5 Hours)

 

 

 

 

Including Tribal Traditions and Knowledge in Language Curriculum Building

(1.5 Hours)

 

 

View Course Description

View Course Description

Ron Gurley

(Cherokee Tribe of Oklahoma)

Nakia Zavalla

(Santa Ynez Chumash)

 

Kathleen Marshall

(Santa Ynez Chumash)

View Instructor Bio

View Instructor Bios

12:00pm - 1:30pm

Lunch (On Your Own)

1:30pm - 3:00pm

Board of Director Training: Accountability and Building Capacity

(3 Hours)

Achieving Accessible Housing for Tribal Members Who are Elderly or Have Disabilities

(1.5 Hours)

Working with Your Local Office of Native American Programs (ONAP) Office

(1.5 Hours)

Continuation of:

 

 

 

Culturally & Environmentally Responsive Design II:
Case Study - Place of
Hidden Waters

(3 Hours)

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

Vince Franco

Jim Warne

(Oglala Lakota)

Kevin Fitzgibbons

 

 

Gentri White

(Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin)

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture Through Team Awareness & Resilience: Day 1

Jamie Blosser

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow Tribe of Montana)

 

Nathaniel Corum

 

 

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Ray Demers

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

3:30pm - 5:00pm

 

Leveraging Your Housing Entity within the Benefits
of a CDFI

(1.5 Hours)

How Tribes and TDHE’s Can Use Section 184 to Develop Multi-Unit Housing Projects

(1.5 Hours)

 

View Course Description

View Course Description

Chris Hansen

(Ojibway)

 

Krystal Langholz

Kevin Fitzgibbons

 

Gentri White

(Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin)

 

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios


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Day 2, Wednesday, April 2, 2014



 

Huron

Ontario | (Lab)

Michigan

Oneida

Bear Room

7:30am - 8:30am

Breakfast (Wolf Room)

8:30am - 10:00am

Continuation of:

Negotiating Federal Community Facilities Funding for $0.00 Down in the
First 3 Years

(6 Hours)

Cultural Revitalization: Keeping Our Culture Alive for Generations: Pt. 1

(3 Hours)

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture Through Team Awareness & Resilience: Day 2

(6 Hours, Day 2)

Innovative Thinking for Healthy Neighborhoods

(3 Hours)

 

Board of Director Training Accountability and Building Capacity

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

Wanda Jean Lord

(Cherokee/Choctaw)

Catherine Parker

(Comanche)

 

Ashleigh Erickson

(Comanche/Caddo)

Denise Harvey

(Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde)

 

Joel Bennett

Jamie Blosser

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow Tribe of Montana)

 

Nathaniel Corum

 

 

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Ray Demers

10:30am - 12:00pm

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

12:00pm - 1:30pm

Lunch (On Your Own)

1:30pm - 3:00pm

Using Storytelling to
Sustain Community

(3 Hours)

Continuation of:

Cultural Revitalization: Keeping Our Culture Alive for Generations: Pt. 2

(3 Hours)

Continuation of:

Designing for Future Generations

(3 Hours)

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

3:30pm - 5:00pm

Ramona Moore Big Eagle

(Tuscarora Nation of North Carolina)

Negotiating Federal Community Facilities Funding for $0.00 Down in the First 3 Years

Catherine Parker

(Comanche)

 

Ashleigh Erickson

(Comanche/Caddo)

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture Through Team Awareness & Resilience: Day 2

Jamie Blosser

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow Tribe of Montana)

 

Nathaniel Corum

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Ray Demers

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios


Top of Agenda | Top of Page

Day 3, Wednesday, April 3, 2014



 

Huron

Ontario

Michigan

Oneida

Bear Room

7:30am - 8:30am

Breakfast (Wolf Room)

8:30am - 10:00am

Financing Green Energy for Tribal Housing

(1.5 Hours)

Charitable Funding & Creating Your Tribal Endowments

(6 Hours)

The Influence of Language on Tribal Culture and Identity

(3 Hours)

Promoting Financial Literacy in Tribal Communities

(3 Hours)

Enterprise Green Communities, A Tribal Overlay

(1.5 Hours)

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

Brian Pierson

 

 

John Clancy

 

Wanda Jean Lord

(Cherokee/Choctaw)

 

Ron Sheffield

(Quechan of Fort Yuma Arizona)

 

Lakota Mowrer

(Cheyenne River Sioux)

 

Drew Tulchin

Jamie Blosser

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow Tribe of Montana)

 

Nathaniel Corum

 

 

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Ray Demers

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

10:30am - 12:00pm

Grant Opportunities to Build Housing Capacity

(1.5 Hours)

Case Studies and Best Practices for Exemplary

Tribal Housing

(1.5 Hours)

View Course Description

View Course Description

Russell Kaney

 

Susan Anderson

Jamie Blosser

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow Tribe of Montana)

 

Nathaniel Corum

 

 

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Ray Demers

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

12:00pm - 1:30pm

Lunch (On Your Own)

1:30pm - 3:00pm

Financing Sustainable Affordable Housing in
Indian Country

(3 Hours)

Continuation of:

Abuse in Indian Country: The Quiet Pain

(3 Hours)

Cultivating Tribal Member Owned Businesses

(1.5 Hours)

Tools for Community Development: An Interactive Workshop

(3 Hours)

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

View Course Description

Shelly Tucciarelli

(Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin)

 

Josie Kotsioris

Charitable Funding & Creating Your Tribal Endowments

Ron Sheffield

(Quechan of Fort Yuma Arizona)

 

Lakota Mowrer

(Cheyenne River Sioux)

 

Drew Tulchin

Jamie Blosser

 

Daniel Glenn

(Crow Tribe of Montana)

 

Nathaniel Corum

Joseph Kunkel

(Northern Cheyenne)

 

Ray Demers

View Instructor Bios

 

3:30pm - 5:00pm

Sources of Capital for Tribal Government NGO’s

(1.5 Hours)

View Course Description

Lakota Mowrer

(Cheyenne River Sioux)

 

Drew Tulchin

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

View Instructor Bios

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Course Descriptions

Abuse in Indian Country: The Quiet Pain

3 Hours

Ron Sheffield

View Bio

This session will explore the history of documented Native American views on sensitive topics such as the abuse of women and children. As well as narrowly examine the historical views of sexuality within Native communities. Much of the course content will come directly from documented instances of abuse, suicide, and oppression within the walls of Tribal communities. This course will be sensitive in nature and presented from an unbiased perspective leaning heavily on the academic literature.

Achieving Accessible Housing for Tribal Members who are Elderly or have Disabilities

1.5 Hours

Jim Warne

View Bio

Is your community accessible for your elders and Tribal members with disabilities? In this presentation, we will address various strategies to evaluating your community’s access needs. We will also discuss the Americans with Disabilities Act, housing accessibility, Tribal/public office access and the impact of disability in Indian Country.

Board of Director Training: Accountability and Building Capacity

3 Hours

Vince Franco

View Bio

Simply put: it’s the ABCs for board members. A corporation is required to have a governing board of directors and regulations require that all organizations are accountable to their stakeholders; therefore, understanding the roles and responsibilities of the Board of Directors is a vitally important function. This session will give an overview of what is entrusted and expected of the Board of Directors. This session will also provide an overview of the development of capacity building initiatives as a roadmap for progress and success, including the implementation of a SWOT Analysis, development of a Logic Model for goal creation, and a Strategic Plan Initiative.

Topics include: Responsibilities of the Board of Directors; Basic Obligations; Qualities of Effective Members; Structure and Operation; Effective Meetings; Building and Maintaining the Infrastructure; Making Service Fulfilling; as well as capacity building through the facilitation of a SWOT Analysis, Logic Model, and Strategic Plan.

Case Studies and Best Practices for Exemplary Tribal Housing

1.5 Hours

Jamie Blosser
Daniel Glenn
Nathaniel Corum
Joseph Kunkel
Ray Demers

View Bios

This session is an instructional session demonstrating key aspects of building sustainable homes through a series of Tribal case studies and best practices. The presentation will highlight the visioning process; innovative approaches; and critical partnerships that Tribal housing authorities are using to build beautiful, culturally relevant, environmentally sound, and healthy homes. This will include a breakout session for participants to discuss how to better introduce a collaborative, culturally appropriate process within their own communities. The end of the session will include a more detailed presentation of Tribal green building best practices. An interactive conversation will follow the presentations asking participants “How will this training impact current and/or future projects?”

Charitable Funding & Creating Your Tribal Endowments

6 Hours

Wanda Jean Lord

View Bio

Building on the highly successful “Charitable Giving to Tribal Organizations” training provided at the Native Learning Center’s 2013 Indian Housing Conference in Tulsa, Oklahoma, this training reviews and expands best practices for Tribes to receive greater funding from diverse sources and to build their own endowments for the long term sustainability of their communities. We will review to whom foundation funders give in Indian Country; and what you’ll need to have in place to begin preparing for corporate, individual and online website ‘asks’. We will then turn to a review of Tribal charitable giving programs and how to translate Tribal generosity into Tribal endowments. We will examine why it might make sense to build Tribal ‘community foundations’ and where to leverage federal and other funding to start that process. Feel free to bring a sample grant request or Tribal project ‘ask’ to develop in class!

Cultivating Tribal Member Owned Businesses

1.5 Hours

Lakota Mowrer
Drew Tulchin

View Bio

Healthy communities depend on small businesses for job creation and economic stability. This session will outline grant opportunities and capital raising strategies for entrepreneurs, as well as discuss ways communities can support entrepreneurial growth. In this session we will discuss identifying community assets and key requirements for small business success.

Cultural Revitalization: Keeping Our Culture Alive for Generations: Pt. 1

3 Hours

Catherine Parker
Ashleigh Erickson

View Bio

Cultural revitalization is important in keeping our Tribal cultures alive for generations to come. We will discuss the modern American Indian and what "Being Indian" means today. It is vital to Tribes to keep our Tribal family member healthy in mind, body, spirit and emotions. This session is open to discussion and is interactive.

Cultural Revitalization: Keeping Our Culture Alive for Generations: Pt. 2

3 Hours

Catherine Parker
Ashleigh Erickson

View Bio

Bringing back a way of life that is lost or dying is the revitalizing of our Native culture. In this session we will slightly touch on our previous session and open up discussion and ideas as they relate to the following subjects: Tribal identity, self-determination, treaty rights, historic trauma, native challenges, and pathways to the future. This session is interactive. We value your ideas and hope that we can learn from you and your Tribes.

Designing for Future Generations

3 Hours

Jamie Blosser
Daniel Glenn
Nathaniel Corum
Joseph Kunkel
Ray Demers

View Bios

The Little Big Horn Campus in Crow Agency, Montana on the Crow Reservation is designed to celebrate and honor Crow culture and create a vibrant working and learning environment for the faculty and students. Developed in a participatory design process led by architect Daniel Glenn, the campus includes several significant buildings and site features that will be presented and discussed by the architect. This class includes the documentary film, Aboriginal Architecture/Living Architecture.

Enterprise Green Communities, A Tribal Overlay

1.5 Hours

Jamie Blosser
Daniel Glenn
Nathaniel Corum
Joseph Kunkel
Ray Demers

View Bio

How do green building programs address the unique needs and issues affecting Tribal housing? The 2011 revision of the Enterprise Green Communities Criteria took steps to address those concerns by convening experts from across the nation to create a Rural/Tribal pathway. As the revision period for the 2015 Criteria is upon us, Enterprise hopes to learn from how we can make our Criteria and Certification even more relevant to low-income residents living in Indian Country?

The 2015 Criteria seeks to provide the most comprehensive standard for promoting healthy, efficient and affordable housing.

Our revisions will stress:

• The importance of improving energy and water performance through sound building practice and cost-effective materials;
• The necessity of preserving and improving neighborhood context by focusing on the importance of traditional housing patterns, while recognizing that the needs of the community must be met;
• Improving the health of residents by continuing to promote healthy materials and appropriate mechanical systems to ensure that all homes are safe, and healthy places for multiple generations.

The session will feature a brief PowerPoint discussion, then a vibrant facilitated discussion with the group. Issues such as building codes, regulatory concerns, architect selection, sustainability, operations, and maintenance as well as others, will all be organized along the project design.

Fighting Methamphetamine and Pharmaceutical Abuse Issues in Indian Country

1.5 Hours

Ron Gurley

View Bio

This course will provide up to date information on two very real dangers in Native America, methamphetamine and pharmaceutical abuse. Discussions and best practice sharing will culminate in the participants taking home a ‘Plan of Action’ that will address their local issues. The basic concept of this course is that in order to celebrate our culture we must maintain that which is healthy and be aware of that which is not. The unhealthy practices not only destroy individuals, but also our Tribal Communities. Methamphetamine and pharmaceutical abuse issues are at its peak across the United States, especially in Indian Country. This course will take a look at what communities need to be aware of and what steps they can take to help alleviate the problem locally. A Native American culturally based approached will be discussed that will address issues in Indian Country.

Financing Green Energy for Tribal Housing

1.5 Hours

Brian Pierson
John Clancy

View Bio

This presentation will describe strategies and financing sources to help Tribes and Tribally Designated Housing Entities (TDHE) achieve energy independence consistent with Tribes' Seven Generations tradition. We will discuss wind, biomass and other renewable energy technologies with a particular focus on solar energy projects due to their special suitability for housing. We'll describe how Tribes and TDHEs can partner with developers who, by taking advantage of federal investment tax credits, can provide 25-30% of the cost of developing solar systems. We will explain how reduced energy costs and state/federal grants can potentially be fully paid for, leaving the TDHE with nearly cost-free energy in place of environmentally harmful carbon-based energy. Finally, we'll discuss development of generation facilities that can power Tribal enterprises and Tribal housing and the permissible uses of the Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) and other financing sources in connection with such projects. We will illustrate recommended clean energy strategies with case studies.

Financing Sustainable Affordable Housing in Indian Country

3 Hours

Shelly Tucciarelli
Josie Kotsioris

View Bio

This session will discuss how to use tax credit incentive programs, such as Low Income Housing Tax Credits and other gap financing resources to improve housing in Indian Country. The presentation will include information on Low Income Housing Tax Credit and structuring, analyzing, and applying for appropriate gap financing. Attendees will examine how to manage lender, investor and community expectations. Lastly, the session will discuss the challenges of developing specific types of sustainable affordable housing such as rural, elder, special needs, and adaptive reuse.

Grant Opportunities to Build Housing Capacity

1.5 Hours

Russell Kaney
Susan Anderson

View Bios

Enterprise provides grant opportunities to Tribes to build housing capacity in several areas. This session will describe the priorities for capacity building, the RFP process and examples of successful projects that got their start with this funding.

History and Success of Youth Programs in Indian Country

1.5 Hours

Ron Gurley

View Bio

Native American Tribes across the country have continually partnered with the Boys and Girls Clubs of America, Big Brothers Big Sisters, and 4-H to help some of our nation’s most at-risk children grow, learn, and develop, while changing lives and surroundings. Reaching children in Indian Country, Alaska and Hawaii has had proven results. This session will review these programs and activities as well as include how they are incorporating local Tribal cultural activities. Participants will receive contact information for these national resources.

How Tribes and TDHE's Can Use Section 184 to Develop Multi-Unit Housing Projects

1.5 Hours

Kevin Fitzgibbons
Gentri White

View Bios

This presentation will discuss the Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) and how it is being adversely impacted by sequestration. If sequestration continues for its proposed 10 years, most IHBGs would experience an approximate 50% reduction in funding. Then the need for housing on Indian Reservations will continue to escalate at a rapid pace. New funding sources must be identified to help address this housing crisis. One program that could play a significant role in increasing housing opportunities is Section 184. Tribes and TDHEs can be borrowers under Section 184 and develop multi-unit housing projects. These projects can be for both rental and homeownership purposes. Housing options range from a single-family unit to a four-plex. Current low interest rates and the fact that Section 184 mortgages are assumable make this a very viable housing option for multi-unit development.

Including Tribal Traditions and Knowledge in Language Curriculum Building

1.5 Hours

Nakia Zavalla
Kathleen Marshall

View Bios

Participants will learn how successfully work with elder advisors, Tribal language committees, and cultural resources within their community to support inclusion of cultural traditions and incorporate this knowledge into language curriculum.

Innovative Thinking for Healthy Neighborhoods

3 Hours

Jamie Blosser
Daniel Glenn
Nathaniel Corum
Joseph Kunkel
Ray Demers

View Bios

This course will focus on a presentation and discussion by the architect of the Payne Family Native American Center, a LEED Platinum project on the University of Montana campus that houses the Native American Studies Department and the American Indian Student Services. The project has become the most visited building on the campus and has received national recognition as the first building of its kind on a university campus. The design symbolically represents the twelve tribes of Montana.

The Influence of Language on Tribal Culture and Identity

3 Hours

Ron Sheffield

View Bio

This presentation will cover the recent findings of the influence that language suppression and legitimizing has had on Tribal communities. Interactive in nature, this session will include many questions for the audience to answer about their own cultural views and perceptions of their own identity.

Learning from Our Elders

3 Hours

Jamie Blosser
Daniel Glenn
Nathaniel Corum
Joseph Kunkel
Ray Demers

View Bios

How can Tribes create more sustainable housing and communities which foster and strengthen their traditions and culture while preserving and sustaining the natural environment? This course will focus on historic precedents in Tribal communities and present contemporary case studies that seek to learn from and honor those traditions. Case studies will include work with the Navajo, Puyallup, Crow, Yaqui, and Nez Perce Tribes and short films documenting some of the projects.

Leveraging Your Housing Entity with the Benefits of a CDFI

1.5 Hours

Chris Hanson
Krystal Langholz

This interactive session will explore the benefits that a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) can bring to your housing entity. Participants will also examine how to leverage CDFI’s to help build your local economy. We will showcase different partnerships that a CDFI and housing entity can bring to communities. This session is designed for those who are new to CDFIs, as well as those who want to learn more about CDFI leveraging and partnership.

Negotiating Federal Community Facilities Funding for $0.00 Down in the First 3 Years

6 Hours

Wanda Jean Lord

View Bio

Participants will receive practical examples of how to negotiate a successful USDA Community Facilities Low Interest Federal Direct Loan and related USDA Economic Impact Initiative Grants. Then utilize these resources to fund the construction of Community Facilities and other infrastructure or facility purchases that benefit their communities. Tribal Council, Leaders, Administrators, Planners, Finance, Development Professionals, Housing Commissioners, and Housing Directors can all benefit from this course.

Preserving Language: Turning Speakers into Teachers

1.5 Hours

Nakia Zavalla
Kathleen Marshall

View Bio

Participants of this session will examine Tribal language programs that prepare our speakers for teaching in community and public school settings. These examples utilize the California Teaching Professional Standards as a guide, but also include culturally appropriate strategies and techniques to overcoming obstacles associated with preserving language.

Promoting Financial Literacy in Tribal Communities

3 Hours

Lakota Mowrer
Drew Tulchin

View Bios

Financial literacy is the basic building block for local economic development in any community. This "Train the Trainer" session will cover strategies for promoting financial literacy among Tribal members. Attendees will be given tools to conduct financial literacy workshops and trainings within their own communities. This interactive workshop is designed to identify resources available within attendee communities that promote financial wellness, including credit score improvement, home ownership, and developing a holistic approach to economic development for Tribal organizations and members.

Revitalizing Work and Tribal Culture through Team Awareness & Resilience: Two Day Workshop

12 Hours, 6 Hours Per Day

Denise Harvey
Joel Bennett

View Bio

This two-day workshop is for any employer/employee seeking effective tools for health promotion inside Tribal organizations. Participants will acquire tools to revitalize culture and improve the overall health and productivity of the workplace/Tribal government. There is a significant relationship between our connection with traditional Tribal values/cultural heritage and the overall health and well being of Tribal organizations. This workshop is based on the presenters’ experience with the Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde and provides a direct experience of an evidence-based program called "Team Awareness" and gives participants skills for transferring concepts from the training back into their Tribal/workplace. A single course that takes place over two days; participants are strongly encouraged to attend both days. Attendance is required on both days to receive the pre-certification as a Team Awareness facilitator.

Site Planning to Sustain Cultural Heritage and Protect Natural Habitat

3 Hours

Jamie Blosser
Daniel Glenn
Nathaniel Corum
Joseph Kunkel
Ray Demers

View Bios

This course will focus on a presentation and discussion by the architect of the Place of Hidden Waters, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for Homes Platinum project, selected as the 2012 Project of the Year by the US Green Building Council's LEED for Homes program. Designed for the Puyallup Tribe in Tacoma, Washington, the project is an exemplar of culturally and environmentally responsive design.

Sources of Capital for Tribal Government NGO's

1.5 Hours

Lakota Mowrer
Drew Tulchin

View Bio

Attendees will learn about sources of capital, both private and public, available for Tribal governments and NGOs. This session covers financial definitions, incremental steps to capital raising, tips for working with banks/lenders, and creditworthiness.

Tools for Community Development: An Interactive Workshop

3 Hours

Jamie Blosser
Daniel Glenn
Nathaniel Corum
Joseph Kunkel
Ray Demers

View Bios

The workshop will highlight preliminary findings for a web-based and interactive sustainable development tool, identified by the Enterprise Rural and Native American Initiative, working with Tribal communities nationwide. This workshop will include a breakout session for participants to discuss how to better introduce an interactive data management tool and integrate culturally appropriate sustainable development processes within their own communities with a database of over 80 Tribal projects.

Using New Market Tax Credits to Enhance Sustainable Communities

3 Hours

Sara Wheelock
Leonika Charging

View Bio

This presentation will focus on how Tribal communities can utilize the New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) Program to enhance sustainable communities. The NMTC Program spurs investment of operating businesses and real estate projects located in low-income communities. NMTCs provide an excellent opportunity for economic development in Indian Country. This presentation will focus on how Tribes can participate in the program by working with Community Development Entities (CDE). We will explain how the NMTC Program can be used to enhance opportunities to provide housing, health, education, and economic development in Indian Country.

Using Storytelling to Sustain Community

3 Hours

Ramona Big Eagle

View Bio

As a people, we have a long-standing tradition of storytelling. In this workshop, participants will learn to use storytelling to bring about more understanding, empathy, and sensitivity towards each other. Participants will learn through activities, how to use storytelling as a tool in their fight against drug addiction, suicide, and any of the elements that tear people apart.

Working with Your Local Office of Native American Programs (ONAP) Office

1.5 Hours

Kevin Fitzgibbons
Gentri White

View Bio

This course will provide an overview of the Office of Native American Programs (ONAP). The session will provide a comprehensive understanding of how ONAP evolved and how it relates to other program areas of HUD as well as other Federal agencies. This course will also discuss the major program functions within each ONAP office: Grants Management, Grants Evaluation, and activities associated with the Office of Loan Guarantee. In addition, this course will closely examine the relationship between Tribes and TDHEs and their respective ONAP Office. How can a meaningful partnership be developed with your ONAP office to ensure that the housing needs of your Tribal members are effectively addressed?

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Travel Accommodations

greenbay180x76

Our host hotel is the Radisson Hotel & Conference Center Green Bay, Green Bay, WI. Rooms are $83.00 per night if you book before Saturday, March 8, 2014. Call booking number 800-333-3333 or direct at 920-494-7300. Attendees must reference the Seminole Tribe of Florida Native Learning Center room block to reserve your room at this rate.

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In accordance with 2 CFR Chapter II Part 200, OMB Super Circular, Subpart E (Cost Principles), Provision 200.432 (Conferences), the Native Learning Center exercises discretion and judgment in ensuring that costs for conferences, training, technical assistance, and all other meetings and events (including retreats, seminars, symposiums, workshops, etc.), are appropriate, necessary, and managed in a manner that minimizes costs to its Federal award.

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