Fair Housing Laws

Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 is commonly known as the Fair Housing Act (FHA).  The FHA prohibits a broad range of practices that discriminate against individuals on the basis of color, disability, familial status, national origin, race, religion, or sex (collectively, “status”) to ensure equal access to housing opportunities. Under the FHA, it is unlawful for direct providers of housing, such as landlords and real estate companies, as well as other entities, such as municipalities, banks, and homeowners’ insurance companies, to discriminate in the sale or rental of, or otherwise make unavailable or deny, a public or privately-owned dwelling because of the status of the renter or buyer. Among other things, this means that local governments cannot exercise their land use and zoning powers in a discriminatory way.

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) enforce the FHA. A person who thinks they have been discriminated against in violation of the FHA can file (1) a complaint with HUD or a local agency certified by HUD or (2) a private civil suit.  The FHA also requires certain HUD grant recipients (e.g., public housing authorities) to affirmatively further fair housing (i.e., counteract the lasting effects of segregation and discrimination).  Some state laws are substantially similar to the FHA. However, some additionally prohibits housing-related discrimination based on age, gender identity or expression, lawful source of income, marital status, or sexual orientation.

Training Objectives:

  • Who does Fair Housing Laws cover?
  • What are the Fair Housing Laws?
  • When should someone be concerned with Fair Housing?

Instructor: Brenda Golden, Esq. (BBA, MBA, J.D.)

Date: May 31, 2018

Time: 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm EST

  • Instructor:

    Brenda Golden, Esq.

    , Brenda Golden, Esq.
  • Brenda Golden is an enrolled citizen of the Muscogee Nation. She attended Sequoyah Indian High School, served 8 years in the US Air Force,  and resided in Central Oklahoma from 1986 to 2013. She has a Bachelor’s and a Masters in Business Administration from the University of Oklahoma, and has graduated from Oklahoma City University School of Law.  Her professional work experience includes over 15 years in HR and Executive Mgmnt.  She has worked for the last 10 years with native organizations.

    Brenda Golden is an enrolled citizen of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. She grew up outside of Clearview, Oklahoma on “Harjo Hill”, attended Sequoyah Indian High School, served in the US Air Force for 8 years and resided in Central Oklahoma from 1986 to 2013.  She currently resides in Eastern Oklahoma having relocated to work for her tribal nation.  Brenda has three daughters (one deceased) and four grandchildren. 

    She has a Bachelor’s in Business Administration in Marketing and a Masters in Business Administration both conferred from the University of Oklahoma.  Brenda graduated from Oklahoma City University School of Law with a Juris Doctor and is a member of the National Native American Bar Association. 

    Her professional work experience includes over 15 years in Human Resources and Executive Management and 10 years with the State of Oklahoma.  She has dedicated the last 10 years to working with tribal governments and native organizations.

  • Category:

    Healthy Homes Management, Housing Strategies, Tribal Government, Webinars

  • Offered: Online
  • Start: May 31, 2018 -
  • End: May 31, 2018 -