The Seminole Tribe of Florida’s Native Learning Center (NLC) is excited to present Training for Tribal Asset Building: Leveraging Resources hosted at Twin Arrows Navajo Casino Resort located in Flagstaff, AZ, September 9 – 11, 2015.

While Tribes have made great strides towards improving housing conditions for their Tribal communities, there is still a need for Tribal Housing Departments and TDHEs to seek alternative resources that also embrace community and economic development.

Join Qualified Instructors and Subject Matter Experts to review, analyze, and discuss the following Training Tracks:

Registration is FREE for Native Americans and Those Working Within Indian Country

Make sure to check back to view Agenda, Course Descriptions, Instructor Bios, and Exhibitor information

Registration

Currently Registration is closed, if you would like to attend Training for Tribal Asset Building: Leveraging Resources you are able to register on-site.

Travel Accommodations

Twin Arrows Navajo Casino Resort, Flagstaff, AZ. Rooms are at the GSA rate of $89.00 per night. Please book before August 25, 2015 for best availability. Room rates do not include 8% Navajo Nation Hotel Occupancy Tax and 5% Sales Tax. Call 928-856-7541 and please mention group booking ID number: 1948 and the Native Learning Center to receive the GSA rate to reserve your room.

In accordance with 2 CFR Chapter II Part 200, OMB Super Circular, Subpart E (Cost Principles), Provision 200.432 (Conferences), the Native Learning Center exercises discretion and judgment in ensuring that costs for conferences, training, technical assistance, and all other meetings and events (including retreats, seminars, symposiums, workshops, etc.), are appropriate, necessary, and managed in a manner that minimizes costs to its Federal award.

TRAINING TRACK: TRIBAL HOUSING IS SELF-DETERMINATION

 DINÉ H/E/BTWIN ARROWS A/B
7:30am - 8:30amRegistration and Exhibits Open
Continental Breakfast
Opening PrayerWelcome from Native Learning Center Team
8:30am - 10:00amDemystifying Section 184 & HUD’s Title VI

Roshawna Atmore

Craig Fondren

Linda Johnson
OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families -
Train the Trainer



CLOSED SESSION
Pre-Registration Required, Click Here to Register


Lanalle Smith
(Navajo Nation)
Chris Hansen
(Ojibway)
10:30am - 12:00pmFinancing the Development of a Mixed-Use/Mixed Income Tribal Community Infrastructure

Roshawna Atmore

Linda Johnson

Andrea Alexander
12:00pm - 1:30pmLunch (On Your Own)
 DINÉ ADINÉ G/DDINÉ CDINÉ I/FTWIN ARROWS A/B
1:30pm - 3:00pmStreamlining the Home-buying Process using Section 184

Darkfeather Ancheta
(Tulalip Tribes of the Tulalip Reservation)
Tribal Affordable Housing & the Low Income Housing Tax Credit 101

Alexandria Murnan
(Cherokee Nation)
How Tribes can Score High on FHLB Affordable Housing Program Application

Roshawna Atmore
Linda Johnson
Kevin Washington
Tribal Communities & Planning for Affordable Housing

Robin Thorne
Lorna Fogg
Continuation of:


OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families - Train the Trainer
3:330pm - 5:00pm

TRAINING TRACK: ASSET BUILDING REQUIRES TRIBAL CAPACITY

 DINÉ H/E/BTWIN ARROWS A
7:30am - 8:30amRegistration and Exhibits Open
Continental Breakfast
8:30am - 10:00amAsset Building Stage 1: Scope & Cost Management

Vicki Colgan

Rand Redlin

Craig Fondren
OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families -
Train the Trainer



CLOSED SESSION
Pre-Registration Required, Click Here to Register


Lanalle Smith
(Navajo Nation)
Chris Hansen
(Ojibway)
10:30am - 12:00pmAsset Building Stage 2: Schedule Management & Delivery Methods Asset Building Stage 3: Project Planning & Design Management

Rand Redlin

Zeenab Fowlk

Kevin Washington
12:00pm - 1:30pmLunch (On Your Own)
 DINÉ ADINÉ G/DDINÉ CDINÉ I/FTWIN ARROWS A/B
1:30pm - 3:00pmProgram Management & Compliance

Robin Thorne
Lorna Fogg

Harnessing the Power of Charrettes as a Planning Tool


Zeenab Fowlk
Andrea Alexander
Rand Redlin

Case Studies in Affordable Housing Projects Using LIHTC

David Benards
Josie Kotsioris
Shelly Tucciarelli
Panel Session: How Green Housing Makes it Truly Affordable

Vicki Colgan Linda Johnson Rand Redlin (RUDL)


Nathaniel Corum
Daniel Glenn
(Crow Tribe of Montana)
Continuation of:


OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families - Train the Trainer
3:30pm - 5:00pmSpecial Session: Case Studies and Best Practices in Sustainable Affordable Housing

Nathaniel Corum
Daniel Glenn
(Crow Tribe of Montana)
 DINÉ H/E/BTWIN ARROWS A
7:30am - 8:30amRegistration and Exhibits Open
Continental Breakfast
8:30am - 10:00amBringing Innovative Businesses to Tribal Housing: Best Practices

Zeenab Fowlk

Andrea Alexander

Kevin Washington
OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families -
Train the Trainer



CLOSED SESSION
Pre-Registration Required, Click Here to Register


Lanalle Smith
(Navajo Nation)
Chris Hansen (Ojibway)
DINÉ ADINÉ G/DDINÉ CDINÉ I/F
10:30am - 12:00pmStarting & Sustaining Native American Business

Andrea Alexander
Craig Fondren
Zeenab Fowlk
Linda Johnson
Kevin Washington
Grant Acquisition and Funding Opportunities for Small Businesses

Ron Gurley
(Cherokee Nation)
The Power of CDFIs in Indian Country


Lanalle Smith
(Navajo Nation)
Building Wealth through Good Credit

Kathy Locklear
(Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina)
1:30pm - 5:00pmContinuation of:


OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families - Train the Trainer

Day 1, Training Track 1: Tribal Housing is Self-Determination

Demystifying the HUD Title VI Guarantee Loan Program Process

1.5 Hours

Roshawna Atmore, Linda Johnson, Craig Fondren

This session will discuss how Tribal housing project gap financing can be obtained by accessing the HUD Title VI Guarantee Loan Program.

Objectives:

The HUD Title VI Guarantee Loan Program can be very useful to Tribes borrowing monies under the Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG). Attendees of this session will:

  • Learn how IHBG recipients (borrower) can finance eligible affordable housing activities, because they are unable to secure financing without the assistance of a federal guarantee.
  • Know the process of leveraging IHBG funds to finance affordable housing activities today can be accomplished by pledging future grant funds as security for repayment of the guarantee obligation.
  • Learn in addition about the timeline involved in achieving Preliminary Letter of Acceptance (PLA) and Firm Commitment requirements to facilitate a private lender or investor to provide the financing and have HUD provide the guarantee to the lender or investor.

Financing the Development of a Mixed-Use/Mixed Income Tribal Community Infrastructure

1.5 Hours

Roshawna Atmore, Linda Johnson, Andrea Alexander

Financing the development of a mixed-use/mixed income Tribal community infrastructure is a complex undertaking that can be understood and successfully accomplished when divided into segments. This session will highlight the stages leading to funding such community infrastructure.

Objectives:

Mixed-use/mixed income Tribal community infrastructure strengthens Tribal physical and financial life. Attendees to this session will primarily:

  • Develop the benefits mixed-use/mixed income Tribal community infrastructure has for Tribes.
  • Explore the stages leading to funding such community infrastructure.
  • Discover the three things to consider when determining development feasibility and methodology in gathering planning documentation.
  • Understand the impact that community outreach has on housing development activities.


OWEESTA Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families – Train the Trainer

6 Hours, Day 1

Lanalle Smith, (Navajo Nation), Chris Hansen, (Ojibway)

This training will offer a three-day, state-of-the-art Instructor Training and Certification Program to help Native CDFIs, Tribes and other Native organizations establish and sustain financial education programs in their communities.

Upon completion of the training, participants will be prepared to successfully pass the Building Native Communities certification exam, becoming certified financial education trainers. Participants must attend and complete all days of training, participate in an oral presentation, and pass the exam to be certified as an instructor.

This three-day training will address:

  • Effective financial education training techniques and resources
  • In depth look at the Building Native Communities: Financial Skills for Families curriculum
  • Organizations will gain access to a new innovative evaluation approach that will assist in the gathering of impact data
  • Participants may be eligible for follow up technical assistance from Oweesta to create and sustain their financial education programs in local communities


Streamlining the homebuying process on or off the reservation using the Section 184 home loan

1.5 Hours

Darkfeather Ancheta

This session will cover the steps to qualify for a Section 184 loan and are the elgible activites for a Section184 loan. If someone can’t qualify right now, this will help them find out what needs to be done to get qualified. This session will highlight the steps through the loan process, applying, qualifying, finding a home, putting in a bid on a home, remodeling/upgrading a home, along with the opportunity to speak to a loan officer.



Tribal Affordable Housing & the Low Income Housing Tax Credit 101

3 Hours

Alexandria Muman, (Cherokee Nation)

The Affordable Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the most effective means to leverage NAHASDA funding and build homes for Tribal members. The LIHTC program can be used to build your community: rental units or eventual homeownership, community buildings, playgrounds, and more. This session will first explain the basics of the program and then dive more deeply into the specifics tailored to each participant. Discussion will include several case studies of successful developments in Indian Country drawing from Travois’ experience with more than 80 tribes and TDHEs.

While it is a federal program, the LIHTC is a competitive application administered by each individual state and it can be a complex and overwhelming process to apply. This session will help attendees break down the process into mangeable parts in an interactive format. Attendees will be able to apply what they’ve learned to their particular circumstance and develop an action plan. Attendees will leave with the information they need to discuss the LIHTC program with stakeholders of their tribe.



How Tribes can Score High on FHLB Affordable Housing Program Application

3 Hours

Roshawna Atmore, Linda Johnson, Kevin Washington

A number of benefits could be gained by using the Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) Affordable Housing Program (AHP) as a source of nontraditional Tribal gap financing. This session will outline these benefits and describe how the FHLB-AHP can be accessed successfully.

Objectives:

The Federal Home Loan Bank – Affordable Housing Program can be very helpful to Tribes. The attendees to this session will:

  • Learn details about and how to get approved for Affordable Housing Program financing even though this program is a competitive grant program with the largest source of private sector grants for housing and community development in the country.
  • Obtain greater knowledge of how to submit applications to specific FHLB regions that give Tribal projects additional points.

Tribal Communities & Planning for Affordable Housing

3 Hours

Robin Thorne, Lorna Fogg

This course will provide information on how to finance and develop Tribal affordable housing projects utilizing the Low Income Housing Tax Credit Program (LIHTC) with NAHASDA and other gap financing programs such as the Federal Home Loan Bank Affordable Housing Program (AHP). Discussion will include information about how to prepare for and navigate the LIHTC application and closing process; secure appropriate GAP financing, and leverage NAHASDA funds. This session will highlight the history of the LIHTC program, how it works with NAHASDA as well as other funding sources, the role of the IRS, State Housing Agencies and Investors. There will be examples of Tribal projects that have successfully used the LIHTC program.

Objectives:

  • Analysis of different opportunities
  • Provide a basic understanding of leveraging
  • Introduce several sources of leverage
  • Provide a timeline and process on the different steps from application through receipt of funding
  • Communication of information based on facts
  • Decision making for the short, mid, and long term
  • Capacity building to ensure success
  • Developing best practices to assist Tribal housing entities in implementing self-determination policies and procedures 

Day 2, Training Track 2: Asset Building Required Tribal Capacity

Asset Building Stage 1: Scope & Cost Management

1.5 Hours

Vicki Colgan, Craig Fondren, Rand Redlin

Learn how scope management sets the boundaries for the project and is the foundation on which the other project elements are built. This is accomplished by understanding how the control of costs requires continual and systematic cost management and monitoring to compare actual costs incurred against targeted budget numbers, and by making appropriate – and at times, creative – adjustments.

Objectives:

Asset building can be more easily understood when broken into three parts. Stage 1 deals with project scope and cost management. Attendees will:

  • Acquire an understanding of why project scoping is the work that must be performed to meet a client’s program goals for space, function, features, impact, and level of quality.
  • Realize why, from the beginning, it helps identify the work tasks and their requirements for completion.
  • See how effective scope management starts with an accurate definition of a Tribe’s requirements in the Planning and Development stage and a systematic process for monitoring and managing all the factors that may impact or change the program requirements throughout the project design and construction phases through delivery of the finished project.
  • Couple instruction with an understanding of how project costs are measured and analyzed in many ways throughout a project, from planning, programming and design to bidding, construction, turnover, and post occupancy.
  • Allow attendees to comprehend that first costs, cost-benefit ratios, and life-cycle costing are a few examples of how a project’s cost-effectiveness can be evaluated.
  • Show how cost management processes start with the establishment of budgets based on actual estimates for related work, and that they must be based on realistic, current market conditions and align with scope and quality requirements.

Attendees will leave knowing why comparing budgets to actual costs throughout the building process is critical. The process continues with milestone estimates, value engineering, procurement strategies, and change order management to ensure the project is timely, as well as cost-effective.


Asset Building Stage 2: Schedule Management & Delivery Methods

Asset Building Stage 3: Project Planning & Design Management

1.5 Hours

Rand Redlin, Zeenab Fowk, Kevin Washington

This session covers how a project schedule defines the processes and establishes a timeline for delivering the project – and that there are many approaches to achieve successful project design and construction.

This session will also offer insight on how to schedule management interfaces directly with scope, cost, and quality management and why team member roles and activities must be defined, coordinated, and continually monitored

Asset building can be more easily understood when broken into three parts. Stage 2 covers schedule management and delivery methods. Attendees will:

  • Learn a key objective of schedule management: how to avoid missing deadlines for delivery of crucial project components.
  • Discover how all of the project’s stages, phases, and activities assigned to each team member can be included in comprehensive project schedules mapped to a timeline containing key dates that are used to keep track of work progress.
  • Understand that it is the goal of every project manager to look for efficiencies in all of these areas as a project progresses.
  • Realize that delivery methods are driven by the project’s scope, budget, and schedule.
    • Become familiar with some of these methods, which include Traditional (Design/Bid/Build), Integrated Delivery Process (where all stakeholders have a financial incentive to work together to produce the desired results), CM (also called CMc, or Construction Manager), Design-Build, Bridging, Lease/Build and Lease Buy Back.
    • Understand that the selection of a delivery method will in turn influence the team composition, schedule, budget, and management plans to be followed throughout the process.

This session will also offer insight on how to schedule management interfaces directly with scope, cost, and quality management and why team member roles and activities must be defined, coordinated, and continually monitored.


 

Program Management and Compliance

3 Hours

Robin Thorne, Lorna Fogg

This session will discuss compliance requirements of NAHASDA, the LIHTC program, and other supplemental funding programs. It will also discuss detailed procedures and requirements needed to ensure operational compliance. Discussion will include a comparison of LIHTC and NAHASDA compliance requirements. The session will provide information relating to the fundamentals of tax credit compliance and how these compliance requirements can be integrated into existing property management policies and procedures. Staff and tenant compliance requirements and the costs and penalties associated with non- compliance will be reviewed. Discussion will also include: income qualifying households, UPCS inspections, the role of the various oversight stakeholders, and other expectations.

Objectives:

  • Provide a basic understanding of management and compliance
  • Understand how leverage and mixed use financing impacts management and compliance
  • Provide a timeline and process on the different steps from application through receipt of funding
  • Analysis of different opportunities
  • Communication of information based on facts
  • Decision making for the short, mid, and long term
  • Capacity building to ensure success
  • Developing best practices to assist Tribal housing entities in implementing self-determination policies and procedures.

Harnessing the Power of Charrettes for Planning

3 Hours

Zeenab Fowlk, Andrea Alexander, Rand Redlin

Charrettes, as a special type of planning meeting and strategy, have been shown to be potent tools for involving communities in supporting and contributing their ideas to a project. This session will introduce this planning tool and show how it can be used to collect community opinions about Tribal projects being developed.

Objectives:

Charrettes are facilitated meetings of people, often with many different opinions. Session attendees will:

  • Learn the benefits of this planning tool.
  • Discover what is necessary to hold a successful charrette.
  • Understand how to stimulate brainstorms, yet easily prioritize group goals.
  • Discover why diverse viewpoints are necessary to create a better project.
  • Learn how to build upon charrette results to create a road map for continued Tribal community involvement and participation.

Case Studies in Affordable Housing Projects Using LIHTC

3 Hours

David Benards, Josie Kotsioris, Shelly Tucciarrelli

Using tax credit incentive programs, such as Low-Income Housing Tax Credits and other gap financing resources to accomplish housing needs in Indian country. This session will include Low Income Housing Tax Credit scoring and structuring, analyzing and apply for appropriate gap

financing, manage lender, investor and community expectations. Discuss the challenges of developing specific types of sustainable affordable housing, such as, rural, elder, special needs and adaptive reuse.


PANEL SESSION: How Green Development Makes Housing Truly Affordable

1.5 Hours

Vicki Colgan, Rand Redlin, Linda Johnson,
Nathaniel Corum, Daniel Glenn (Crow Tribe of Montana)
Greening, or creating sustainable, development for affordable homes pays back the Tribe and the residents in many ways. This session will explore these benefits, examine general costs to show that greening developments enhances the Tribal bottom line, as well as heightens general Tribal member well-being.

Objectives:

Green development has given many advantages to its supporters. Attendees to this session will:

  • Uncover the most compelling advantages in such development
  • Learn how greening is accomplished
  • Identify the low-hanging fruit in their areas
  • Hear of successes and about resources available to them by accessing case studies

Special Session: Case Studies and Best Practices in Sustainable Affordable Housing

1.5 Hours

Nathaniel Corum, Daniel Glenn (Crow Tribe of Montana)

This session will highlight the visioning process, innovative approaches and critical partnerships that Tribal housing authorities are using to build beautiful, culturally relevant, environmentally sound and healthy homes. This will include a breakout session, for participants to discuss how to better introduce a collaborative, culturally appropriate process within their own communities. The end of the session will include a more detailed presentation of Tribal green healthy building best practices. This instructional session will present lessons learned and best practices based on site visits, dialogue, video documentation and research that was funded by a HUD Policy Development and Research Office Sustainable Construction in Indian Country grant.

Day 3, Training Track 3: Native Businesses Strengthen Tribal Community

Bringing Innovative Businesses to the Marketplace: Best Practices

1.5 Hours

Zeenab Fowk, Andrea Alexander, Kevin Washington

This course will use a considerable amount of group activity to explore innovative business ideas, the challenges of finding something “new” to present, new and innovative marketing techniques, and Best Practices learned from both traditional and innovative businesses.

Objectives:

  • Learn how to create a support system of your own;
  • Learn about Bookkeeping and other practical considerations for business owners;
  • Discuss more in-depth employer issues (Insurance, training, safety, morale);
  • Receive an introduction to Branding, Traditional Marketing and Social Media;
  • Learn about Customer Service – the Critical Difference;
  • Explore Work-Life Balance, and;
  • Perform (depending on class length) one to three exercises to imbed information.

Starting and Sustaining Native American Business

1.5 Hours

Craig Fondren, Zeenab Fowk, Andrea Alexander, Kevin Washington, Linda Johnson

This session is an introduction to the possibility of small business ownership; exploring the steps from business idea to definition to implementation. Business ownership is not for everyone; so we will begin with an assessment which will assist in determining whether or not this is a viable path and will explore options responding to the desire of business ownership. The session will cover how to assess the business environment, whether local or online and by the end of the course, the student will know how to move their idea forward to profitability.

Objectives:

  • Taking an assessment to determine whether or not business ownership is for them;
  • Explore various ownership options;
  • Investigate business creation and support resources;
  • Receive introduction to a business plan;
  • Learn about Employees versus Independent Contractors;
  • Receive introduction to Technology and the Small Business;
  • Learn about Financing and Legal considerations regarding Small Business ownership, and;
  • Perform (depending on class length) one to three exercises to imbed information.

Grant Acquisition and Funding Opportunities for Small Business

1.5 Hours

Ron Gurley, (Cherokee Nation)

Today’s economy makes it more and more challenging to compete for additional funding. This session will give the participant a head’s up or advandage over others who are competing for the same funds. Discussions will include not only government funding opportunities, but how philanthropical foundations are a valuable asset to acquiring funds. There are Corporate, Community, and Family Foundations that designate a portion of their annual giving to Native Americans. Attend this session and learn more about who they are, where they are located, and who they have funded recently in Native America.


 The Power of CDFIs In Indian Country

1.5 Hours

Lanelle Smith

Native Community Development Financial Institutions are specialized financial institutions that work with people or communities that are underserved by traditional financial institutions. Learn about the different ways CDFIs can be structured, why they are important, and how they make a difference in Native communities.

Objectives:

  • What is a Native CDFI?
  • Identify benefits & impacts within Native Communities
  • Discuss and compare best practices
  • How do I start a CDFI?

Building Wealth Through Good Credit

1.5 Hours

Kathy Locklear

You can create personal wealth. It’s possible to meet your financial goals. By choosing to budget, save and invest, you can pay off debt, send a child to college, and buy a comfortable home. Our financial success can depend on our ability to manage credit. Through understanding what affects our credit, and how we can control it we can build wealth. Credit affects our lives in many ways, it can determine where we work, or live, but we have the power to control our credit.

Instructor Name: Alexander, Andrea

Company/Organization: Rural and Urban Development League, LLC

Bio:

Andrea Alexander has over 30-years of experience providing development in the native community and runs her own business, Energy Innovation Foundation. Her firm provides strategic planning and project development for Tribal governments and non-profit organizations, and supports economic development that leads to new job creation for northwest native people both on and off the reservation. Andrea Alexander has been a native community activist for 10 years around telecommunications and energy as it relates to current policies & programs that impact tribal governments. She is the founding board member of the Intertribal Transportation Association. She served as the Director of Energy for the Affiliated Tribes of Northwest Indians, Deputy Director for the Washington State Office on Indian Affairs, and with her own tribe, the Makah Tribe to create public/private partnerships in the Northwest. Andrea gained her philanthropic experience through the First Nations Development Institute, than as the Director of Grants for Social Justice Fund Northwest, and as a volunteer for the Philanthropy Northwest Grantmakers of Color and as the founder for the Potlatch Fund.

Andrea was educated at the University of Colorado in Boulder in Business Administration and Marketing, and has professional development from Peninsula College in Small Business Development.


Instructor Name: Ancheta, Darkfeather

Tribal Affiliation: Tulalip Tribes of Tulalip Reservation

Company/Organization: 1st Tribal Lending

Bio:

Darkfeather Ancheta is employed with First Tribal Lending, where she is HUDs Tribal Outreach Specialist. Through HUDs 184 Native Home Loan Program she assists tribal members with purchasing homes, educating them on preparing for home ownership and its process. Darkfeather’s financing background, and experience as a Loan Officer shows her in depth knowledge in home purchasing and understanding finances. Establishing relationships between tribal members, financial institutions, realtors and BIA, she claims the title as a Liaison in her field of work. Darkfeather also has firsthand experience in home ownership, purchasing her own property in 2004 using the 184 Native Home Loan Program.

After a couple years, Darkfeather and Collogues went to MidAmerica/1st Tribal Lending. Since the transition, the team has grown three times the size. Some of the team has been working together for over 14 years, and they are now the #1 HUD lenders out there.


Instructor Name: Atmore, Roshawna

Company/Organization: Rural and Urban Development League, LLC

Bio:

Roshawna D. Atmore has more than 15-years combined working experience with municipal, not-for-profit and for-profit corporate organizations, including nonprofit and housing investment corporations. She is an accomplished project manager with strong financial acumen and expert knowledge of budgeting, project planning, identifying technical solutions and mitigating risks. She also has strong analytical skills, efficiently analyzing financial data and managing costs with real time budgeting data. Roshawna is versed and skilled in creating and leading teams from multiple disciplines and implementing vision, strategies and plans. She has managed and led multiple projects from concept to occupancy, and has successfully raised capital funding on first time applications for project values from $3 to $10 million. She has also managed development strategies and technical assistance for nationwide development projects valued in the range from $4.5 to $25 million.

Roshawna earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics Applied Science from the University of California, Los Angeles and a Masters of business administration (MBA), with a concentration in Finance from the Arizona State University. She also earned a Masters of Real Estate Development from the University of Southern California.


Instructor Name: Bernards, Donald

Company/Organization: Turtle Clan Development Services 

Bio:

Donald Bernards is a partner and firm-wide leader of the affordable housing services team with Baker Tilly. Since 1999, he has specialized in financial advisory services that include structuring affordable housing transactions and helping to obtain debt, equity, and soft funds to bring projects to fruition.

In the past five years, Don has helped to close affordable housing transactions with more than $800 million of equity including LIHTC, historic tax credits, and New Markets Tax Credits. His client base includes not-for-profits, for-profits, public housing authorities, and Indian Country entities.

Don is an active member of the National Housing Council and sits on a State Housing Finance Agency tax credit advisory committee. He is also a member of National American Indian Housing Council. Don has also worked with the HUD Office of Native American Programs to provide education on leveraging Indian Housing Block Grant Funds. He regularly presents at industry events. Recent presentations include “How to do Bond Deals Using 4% Credits in Wisconsin” and “RAD (HUD’s Rental Assistance Demonstration program) in Wisconsin,” both at the July 2015 “A Home for Everyone” conference, and “Tax Credit and Tax-Exempt Bond Boot Camp” at Affordable Housing Finance (AHF) Live n November 2014.


Instructor Name: Colgan, Vickie

Company/Organization: Rural and Urban Development League, LLC

Bio:

Vicki Colgan has more than 30-years combined work experience with municipality, state government, and working with Fortune 500 companies. She is an accomplished systems analyst providing consultation and technical assistance for sustainable building, water/solid waste issues. She has an extensive background in business management and development, corporate training, ergonomics, marketing and facilitation. Vicki has also designed and led workshops for regional conferences, including the Solid Waste Association of North America and the North American Hazardous Materials Management Association. On the scientific/legal side, her background includes field experience in geology, hydrology, and water law. She has assisted a number of housing authorities, Habitat for Humanity affiliates and tribes in creating sustainable as well as affordable housing. She is also a government program specialist in funding sustainability and Brownfield redevelopment.

Vicki earned a Bachelor of Education degree in Social and Earth Sciences from the Central Washington University, and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Foreign Languages from the University of Washington. She is also a Certified Sustainable Building Advisor, a Legacy LEED® Accredited Professional, and a Charrette Planner/Manager as certified by the National Charrette Institute. She also has earned additional certifications in neuro-linguistics, secondary education, adult learning behavior, organizational development and facilitation.


 Instructor Name: Fogg, Lorna

Company/Organization: Vital Spirit, LLC

Bio:

Lorna Fogg is a founding partner of VitalSpirit LLC. Lorna has worked in the tax credit industry since 1995, previously as the Director of Acquisitions for Raymond James Tax Credit Funds Inc., a tax credit syndicator and later as President/CEO of Travois Inc. an affordable housing consulting firm that specializes in Indian Country. Her experience includes underwriting, asset management and serving both as an investor and client liaison. As president of Travois, Lorna oversaw staff working in areas of Low Income Housing Tax Credits, gap financing, compliance and New Markets Tax Credits and provided training and education to tribes, investors and other agencies. She was previously a member of Novogradac & Company LLP’s LIHTC Working Group, which works to resolve technical and administrative LIHTC program issues. Lorna graduated from the University of South Florida with a degree in accounting.


Instructor Name: Fondren, Craig

Company/Organization: Rural and Urban Development League, LLC 

Bio:

Craig Fondren has more than 25-years combined work experience with not-for-profit and for-profit corporate organizations, including serving as the Executive Director for a Community Development Corporation in Portland, Oregon, with multi-million dollar housing development projects. He has extensive management experience providing local and national best practice tools in public/private educational partnerships for workforce development. He has managed non-profit technology education programs in distressed communities. Craig is also a proven specialist with professional leadership and organizational management training, fund development, housing development, program design and implementation, including the development of a nationwide corporate youth leadership initiative.

Craig earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from University of Kansas in History, and was a two-year graduate fellow with the Enterprise Foundation Volunteer & Leadership Institute. In addition, he has earned Certification in Project Management from Portland State University Institute for Non-profit Management; National Endowment for Financial Education Certification; Western Association of Educational Opportunity Personnel TRIO Certification; and a Northwest Association of Special Programs Certification from the University of Washington.


 

Instructor Name: Fowlk, Zeenab

Company/Organization: Rural and Urban Development League, LLC

Bio:

Zeenab A. Fowlk is the Vice President, Chief Operating Officer (COO) and Founder of RUDL and has 20-years of professional experience dedicated to nonprofit organizations including community social services agencies and nine years in healthcare. She is the programmatic and organizational development lead consultant operating out of the RUDL East Coast office on client contracts. She is the former Executive Director of the Greater Nevada Fair Housing Council serving 15 rural counties providing fair housing outreach, education and enforcement, as well as the Executive Director for Gang Alternatives Partnership (GAP) in Reno, Nevada providing alternatives to juvenile delinquency for children and youth. For nearly three years, she served as the Deputy Director for the Washington, D.C. Youth Court – Time Dollar Youth Court. She is also a skilled event planner, special projects and operational manager with expertise in non-profit management in healthcare, social services, youth program development, and fair housing compliance.

Zeenab holds a Master of Science degree in Management, with a Marketing Specialty from the University of Maryland University College, Adelphi, MD; and graduated with a Bachelor of Science degree in Political Science from the University of Oregon at Eugene. She also earned a Certificate in Project Management from University of Maryland Baltimore College.


Instructor Name: Glenn, Daniel, AIA, NCARB, S.M.Arch.S.

Tribal Affiliation: Crow Tribe of Montana

Company/Organization: Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative

Bio:

Daniel Glenn (Crow) is an NCARB-Certified Architect with twenty-seven years of experience in the design of affordable, sustainable architecture in urban and rural environments across the United States and abroad. He is the Principal of 7 Directions Architects/Planners, an Indian-owned design and planning firm based in Seattle, WA. Much of Mr. Glenn’s work focuses on sustainable design for tribal communities, rooted in his heritage from the Crow Tribe of Montana.

His design work has received national and regional recognition, including the 2012 LEED for Homes Project of the Year for the Puyallup Tribe’s Place of Hidden Waters. Four of his projects were published in 2013 in Design Re-Imagined: New Architecture on Indigenous Land. A graduate of MIT’s Design and Housing Program, he is on the Board of Directors of Navajo FlexCrete, a subsidiary of the Navajo Housing Authority, and is a regularly invited speaker on sustainable design at professional and academic conferences, including HUD Office of Native American Program events nationally, and is currently providing technical assistance and training to multiple tribes in the greening of Indian housing for HUD’s Sustainable Construction in Indian Country program, the Enterprise Community Partners Rural and Native American Initiative and for the Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative.


Instructor Name: Gurley, Ron

Tribal Affiliation: Cherokee Nation

Company/Organization: Gurly & Associated LLC

Bio:

Ron is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation and the Cherokee Elders Council. He holds the degree M. Ed. He is in his fifth decade working with Native American families and youth. During his 22 years in public education he served as a Music Teacher, Indian Education Reading and Math Teacher, Counselor, Assistant Superintendent, Director of Curriculum, and served as Superintendent of Schools.

Following his career in education, four & one-half years were spent as a Case Manager Supervisor in a newly created Social Services Department within the Housing Authority of the Cherokee Nation under supervision of Principal Chief Wilma Mankiller.

Ron served as Founder and Chief Professional Officer of Boys & Girls Clubs of Green Country, Inc. located within the Cherokee Nation from 1997 to 2007. He served as Chairman of NANAC, Boys & Girls Clubs of America’s Native American National Advisory Committee. Ron was Native American Program Specialist for FirstPic Inc. Ron currently owns and operates Gurley & Associates LLC consulting firm.


Instructor Name: Hansen, Chris

Tribal Affiliation: Ojibway

Company/Organization: First Nations Oweesta 

Bio:

Christopher Hansen is an Ojibway from the Pillager Band located in White Earth, Minnesota. He is currently the Training Coordinator for First Nations Oweesta Corporation. He is responsible for the coordination and delivery of training for Oweesta and is actively involved in many programs to increase awareness in regards to Financial Literacy and Asset Building in Native communities. He studied Communications at Colorado University in Boulder, Colorado and has worked as a Real-Estate Broker for twelve years specializing in Residential Sales. He was very active in mentoring and teaching first-time home-buyers on how to qualify for community-based, as well as conventional residential loan products.


 Instructor Name: Johnson, Linda

Company/Organization: Rural and Urban Development League, LLC 

Bio:

Linda Johnson is the President, Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and co-Founder of RUDL. She has more than 35-years of experience as an affordable housing developer, a community development financial specialist allocating and utilizing federal, state, housing authority and local government funding sources. Her professional experience includes work in Northern Nevada with the Municipal Lending Program as the Community Resources Programs Manager and Housing Programs Administrator for the City of Reno, Nevada; the Reno Housing Authority as a Development Specialist; and Reno-Sparks Tribal Government as an Economic Development Planning Director. She has been a grant reviewer for the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) since 1998. Currently, she operates as a development consultant for nonprofits, faith-based organizations and tribal governments to develop capacity in Alabama, California, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, Oklahoma, Oregon, Washington state and Washington D.C., along with the American Samoans.

Linda earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Oregon State University in Institutional Management and Dietetics, and coursework toward a Master in Urban Planning at University of Oregon School of Architect Planning and Public Policy Management Department as a Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Fellow. In addition, she is certified by the National Development Council as a Financial Development Professional.


Instructor Name: Kotsioris, Josie

Company/Organization: Turtle Clan Development Services

Bio:

Josie Kotsioris, Senior Manager for Baker Tilly, works with a broad array of clients and staff serving communities nationwide. She focuses on a national portfolio of clients including developers, communities, local governments, housing authorities, investors, and community-based lenders.

Josie has more than twenty years of affordable housing, community development, and real estate experience. Before joining Baker Tilly in 2007, she spent thirteen years working for the Illinois Housing Development Authority (IHDA). In her former position, she ran the tax credit programs for IHDA, which is a tax credit allocating agency for the State of Illinois.

Josie specializes in affordable housing and community development services including tax credit incentive finance sources, pre-development services, application support, financial structuring and analysis, Section 8 preservation and preservation of other federally subsidized housing, tax-exempt bond financing, and tax credit preservation and disposition. Josie is approved by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) as a Neighborhood Stabilization Program Expert and Team Leader and provides technical assistance through HUD to state/local grantees. Josie also is active with Baker Tilly’s New Markets Tax Credit (NMTC) practice.

She is a nationally recognized speaker and is considered a “can-do” force in the affordable housing industry.


Instructor Name: Locklear, Kathy

Tribal Affiliation: Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina

Bio:

Kathy Locklear a member of the Lumbee Tribe of North Carolina: My background includes many years as an Industrial Engineer, before transitioning to become a public servant. I began as a Housing Coordinator for the National Self-Help Program funded by the USDA, and administered by the NC Indian Housing Authority. After that, I spent a year with Consumer Credit Counseling then moving to my current position as Financial Education and Housing Manager for the Lumbee Tribe.

I am responsible for an average budget of 4 million dollars for the construction of new homes, and other housing related services.   We receive annual funding from NAHASDA. I hold a business degree and a Masters of Public Administration. I serve on the advisory board for Robeson Community College Small Business Center, and the advisory board for Consumer Credit Counseling.


 

Instructor Name: Murnan, Alexandria

Tribal Affiliation: Cherokee Nation

Bio:

Alexandria Murnan works with tribes and tribally designated housing entities to develop, win, and secure financing for Low Income Housing Tax Credit developments. She is a project coordinator with Travois, a consulting firm celebrating its 20th anniversary that has secured more than $1 billion in financing for affordable housing and economic development in Indian Country. In her role at Travois, Alexandria works with tribes to conceptualize their affordable housing vision and secure financing to bring that vision to reality.

Alexandria is an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation and has a Bachelor’s degree in Public Administration and American studies from the University of Kansas and a Master’s degree in City and Regional planning from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Alexandria’s graduate course work focused on affordable housing development and prior to working at Travois she taught English as a Second Language to Haitian immigrants and worked for the Washington, D.C. Downtown Business Improvement District. Alexandria also authored several case studies on rural development as an intern at the United States Department of Agriculture.


 Instructor Name: Redlin, Rand

Company/Organization: Rural and Urban Development League, LLC

Bio:

Rand W. Redlin has more than 20-years combined work experience with not-for-profit and for-profit corporate organizations, primarily with real estate development consulting on commercial, multifamily, affordable housing and mixed-use buildings. His development experience includes new construction, land development, acquisition, renovation, retail space and international consultation. He is a certified project manager with experience in the renovation, new development and construction of projects with financing from $800,000 to $22 million. Rand is very supportive of the CLT homeownership model for its contribution to social and economic justice and is committed both to affordable housing and the integration of sustainable development in affordable housing. Rand earned a Bachelor of Arts in Social Science degree in Law, Politics and Economics, with a minor in Geography and History from the University of Washington. He also has a Masters in Business Administration from the University of Texas at Dallas. He earned a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) AP certification from the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) with expertise in the design and construction phases of green building; and certification from the Project Management Institute (PMI).


Instructor Name: Smith, Lanelle

Tribal Affiliation: Navajo Nation

Company/Organization: First Nations Oweesta 

Bio:

Lanelle Smith, Program Manager for First Nations Oweesta, is an experienced Technical Assistance provider who runs Oweesta’s new back-office service program. Formerly, Lanelle served as Principal for Black Feather Development, LLC, and an independent consultant firm providing services to organizations focused on increasing organizational capacity.


Instructor Name: Thorne, Robin

Company/Organization: Vital Spirit, LLC

Bio:

Robin Thorne is a founding partner of VitalSpirit LLC. She has over ten years of experience working with tribal clients in developing and managing their affordable housing projects. Robin works directly with tribal housing authority staff to ensure compliance with LIHTC, NAHASDA, AHP and other affordable housing program requirements. She is a frequent speaker at industry trainings and events, conducts seminars and makes regular on-site visits to clients and tribal partners. With the National American Indian Housing Council, Robin created the NAHASDA & Tax Credit Compliance Professional (NTCCP) curriculum and national certification program, which designates professional experience and expertise in continuing operational compliance under the two programs. She also works with tribal clients, tribal advocacy groups, state allocating agencies and elected officials to ensure that tax credit and grant programs policies reflect the concerns and needs of tribal organizations. Robin is certified as a National Compliance Professional Executive (NCPE) and served six years on the NCP Advisory Board for the Housing Credit College. She is also a Housing Credit Certified Professional (HCCP), designated by the National Association of Home Builders. Robin graduated from the University of South Florida with a degree in communications and English.


Instructor Name: Tucciarelli, Shelly

Tribal Affiliation: Oneida Nation

Company/Organization: Turtle Clan Development Services

Bio:

Shelly J.Tucciarelli, owner of Turtle Clan Development Services, LLC, a Native American‒owned small business, has more than twenty years of experience in management, training, administration, and development of affordable housing and economic development. Shelly uses her skills to assist Native American communities and tribes meet their affordable and community development needs.

Shelly previously worked as a Low-Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) allocator for the state HFA in Illinois. She has deployed more than $900 million in LIHTC in her career. She is very experienced with utilizing and administering affordable housing programs, federal funding programs, and multifamily lending.

Shelly is active within the community and serves on the advisory boards of two New Markets Tax Credits (NMTC) Community Development Entities (CDEs). She is also a board member for the not-for-profit Full Circle Communities in Chicago, Illinois, and the not-for-profit Design Coalition Institute in Madison, Wisconsin.


Instructor Name: Washington, Kevin

Company/Organization: Rural and Urban Development League, LLC

Bio:

Kevin Washington has more than 18-years combined work experience working with federal regulated industries, national and global companies. He has substantial knowledge and professional background in commercial real estate banking, financial analysis and portfolio management, nearly $300 million. He is also an exceptional program manager where he has worked with an award-winning global fleet management solution company with internal service partners and external customers to manage requests for improvement and enhancement of fleet management software and systems, to assist with prioritization of Research & Development resources, monitoring project and budget progress to avoid delays and provide proper resource allocation. His formative career was in commercial real estate banking, financial analysis and portfolio management. Kevin was the Vice President, Internal Asset Review with First Bank of Beverly Hills, NA in Calabasas, California where he was the member of the Compliance Committee responsible for implementation and monitoring of Board, Audit, SOX, and Regulatory policies with special emphasis on the Community Reinvestment Act.

Kevin earned a Master of Science in Economics from the University of Oregon at Eugene, and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics from California State University – Dominquez Hills. He is also Pragmatic Marketing Certified.

Mildred and Lillian Jackson (Caddo Nation of Oklahoma)

Mother/ daughter team. Making hand crafted items for 30 years. Contemporary beadwork and sewn items using native print fabrics.


 

Kay Wiltfong (Cherokee Nation)
K Handbags and more

Owner, Kay Wiltfong, will be selling her hand made handbags, cases, beadwork and accessories.


 

Paul D Bradford, Roger L McCoy, CPA, and Tom S Mcgeisey (Peoria Tribe of Indians of Oklahoma)
First Nations Advisors

First Nations Advisors are individual group of professionals providing consulting services to Native American Tribes in the Areas of Housing, Economic Development planning, 8(a) certification, IHP Planning, Business Planning, Governmental Contracting, Audit Services, Financial Literacy for Tribal members and Training Services. Paul D Bradford, Partner, Has over 40 Years Experience in Public Accounting and Fortune 500 Companies such as IBM, Citgo Petroleum, Chevron, Bank of Oklahoma and Trust Services. Paul has been a NAIHC presenter since 2010 and Public Accounting Audit Manager to Native American Tribes since 2007. Roger L McCoy, CPA, has over 40 years experience in Public Accounting, State of Oklahoma Management, and University Staff Management and Native American Tribal Services. Malcolm P Johnson, CPA;. Malcolm P Johnson , CPA’s PLLc has been providing Tribal Auditing Service! s to Native American Housing Entities for over 40 Years.HDS, Housing Data Services, HDS provides Fee Accounting Services to Native American Tribes with over 40 Years experience.Joanne Nichols, VP has also been a panel presenter to annual NAIHC forums since 2014. First Nations Advisors can be reached through their website at www.firstnationsadvisors.com


 

Anita Carpenter and Kahlaya McKinney (Navajo Nation, Arizona New Mexico & Utah)
Capacity Builders, Inc.

Capacity Builders is a non-profit organization that works hand in hand with community members, government leaders, schools, non-governmental entities to identify, assess, develop, implement, and sustain programs and services that address major areas of need and interest. Náásgóó Diné t’áá bí ádánidahat’áago iiná yá’át’ééhii yee deiíkaah dooleel biniiyé ádeiit’i´ (Dedicated to the health, wellness and quality of life of the Diné and other Native American communities). Capacity Builders’ programs positively impact the lives of Native American children, families and individuals. We focus our attention, skills and resources on four main areas:

•Economic Development: Projects designed to build sustainable economies, grow assets, and develop talent.
•Capacity Building: Capacity building is the key to growth and sustainability of nonprofits. Capacity Builders works with nonprofits, governments, and tribes to help them fulfill their missions.
•Wellness: Initiatives designed to promote healthy lifestyles through school and community-based fitness programs, drug and alcohol prevention, victim services, violence prevention and health education.
•Youth Services: Programs that help youth reach their employment, education, and personal goals.


 

Joe Seidenberg
Red Feather Development Group

Red Feather believes that safe healthy homes are the foundation for healthy families and communities. Our mission is to partner with American Indian nations to develop and implement sustainable solutions to the housing needs within their communities. We achieve this by building and improving homes with sustainable materials, providing green construction training and employment opportunities, and conducting community outreach and
education on sustainable building practices and healthy housing.


 

William Clark (Pueblo of Laguna, New Mexico) and Philissa Calamity (Navajo Nation, Arizona New Mexico & Utah)
Turquoise Wild

Turquoise Wild , from New Mexico travels around the United States selling our fine and craft art, and cand find us at Albuquerque Old Town also. Majority what you will see on our table are Laguna Pueblo pottery and few jewelry(necklaces, bracelets, and earrings). 90 percent on our table we make, 10 percent are friends art work.


 

Dark feather Ancheta (Tulalip Tribes of Washington) and Renee Konski
1st Tribal Lending

Here at 1st Tribal Lending we are dedicated to providing you with Section 184 Home Loans. We’ve made it our mission to provide you with an easy and efficient experience. Many of our employees were pioneers in the 184 business and have been doing these loans since the beginning of the program. We’ve successfully closed thousands of HUD Section 184 Title loans around the nation. This has made us the go to experts on HUD Section 184 loans.

KEEP SOCIAL WITH THE NLC AND FOLLOW US FOR TRAINING UPDATES